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Police: Houston airport gunman intent on suicide

| Friday, May 3, 2013, 6:24 p.m.

HOUSTON — A man appeared intent on suicide, or what's known as suicide by cop, when he opened fire with a pistol inside a busy terminal at Houston's largest airport and died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, police said Friday.

Carnell Marcus Moore, 29, of Beaumont shot himself in the temple with a 40-caliber semi-automatic pistol Thursday afternoon after shooting twice into the ceiling at a ticketing area at Bush Intercontinental Airport.

A Department of Homeland Security special agent who confronted him in the terminal also shot and wounded him in the shoulder when Moore refused to drop his weapon. Homicide Sgt. Brian Harris said Moore's head wound was the fatal gunshot.

“At this point we know what this was and what it wasn't,” said Harris' partner, investigator Fil Waters. “And what it was, was a desperate act committed by a confused young man who has apparently lost all hope.”

Moore had a bag containing an AR-15 rifle, which he did not use, a Gideon Bible and a suicide note that indicated Moore had no plans to hurt others, Harris said.

“ ‘Here in the last hour, I yield to mercy when this could have turned bad,' ” Harris said, reading the note signed by Moore.

Surveillance video shows Moore arriving at the airport's Terminal B just after noon, dragging a bag he took from his pickup and taking a seat. The gunfire erupted about 90 minutes later. People in the terminal began screaming and running for cover, but no one else was hurt.

Houston Police Chief Charles McClelland said it is not illegal for people to carry firearms in public areas and that Moore had not breached secure areas of the airport.

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