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Al-Jazeera entrenchment in U.S. raises fear of promoting anti-Semitism

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By Gannett
Monday, May 6, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Some say a dozen Al-Jazeera news bureaus across the country could offer greater coverage of world issues. Some, though, fear it could promote anti-Semitism.

The news organization, which bought Al Gore's Current TV for $500 million this year, will begin broadcasting Al-Jazeera America this summer.

“We're trying to have bureaus in places where other networks do not,” said Bob Wheelock, executive producer of Al-Jazeera English.

Bureaus are to be opened in New York, Washington, Miami, Nashville, Chicago, New Orleans, Detroit, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle, according to Politico.

Al-Jazeera America probably will be very similar to other news networks, said Saleh Sbenaty, a Middle Tennessee State University engineering professor and a board member of the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tenn.

“It would be good for people to hear different voices to get a different point of view and coverage of issues that might not be covered by the media here,” he said.

A critic said she would welcome the network's presence in Nashville, but for a different reason.

“I'm not opposed to them coming in, because a lot of people do not know of Al-Jazeera's anti-Semitic, anti-Jewish and anti-Israel bias,” said Laurie Cordoza-Moore, president of the pro-Israel group Proclaiming Justice to the Nations, based in Franklin, Tenn.

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