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FBI: Minnesota raid scuttles planned attack

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AP
Buford Rogers was arrested on Friday, May 3, 2013, during a raid on a mobile home in Montevideo, Minn. Authorities said that Rogers is charged with one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm and the agency believes it disrupted a potential terror attack after a search of the home turned up Molotov cocktails, suspected pipe bombs and firearms.

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By The Associated Press
Monday, May 6, 2013, 8:39 p.m.
 

MINNEAPOLIS — FBI officials said Monday that they foiled a terrorism attack that was being planned in a small western Minnesota town, but they offered no details about the exact targets of the attack — or the motive of the man accused of having a cache of explosives and weapons in a mobile home.

Buford Rogers, 24, made his first appearance Monday in U.S. District Court in St. Paul on one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

Rogers of Montevideo was arrested Friday as authorities searched a mobile home he's associated with and found Molotov cocktails, suspected pipe bombs and firearms, according to a court affidavit.

FBI spokesman Kyle Loven said that the investigation is ongoing, and agents are looking at the case as one of domestic terrorism.

Loven said the alleged target was believed to be in Montevideo, a city of about 5,000 people about 130 miles west of Minneapolis.

He declined to say whether Rogers was believed to be acting alone or as part of a group.

Montevideo police Chief Adam Christopher said a homemade sign in front of the mobile home that bore the letters “BSM” refers to a local anti-government militia group called the Black Snake Militia, which the Rogers family started.

Rogers' father, Jeff Rogers, told KMSP-TV his son doesn't own any guns, and the guns in the home belonged to him.

“He was not out to bomb nobody, and I have no clue where the hell that came from,” he said.

According to a federal affidavit, Buford was present during the raid, and one firearm recovered from the residence was a Romanian AKM assault rifle.

In an interview with authorities, Rogers admitted firing the weapon on two separate occasions at a gun range in Granite Falls, the affidavit said. Rogers has a 2011 conviction for felony burglary and is not allowed to have a firearm.

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