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Nicotine logic? California woman hit cop to quit smoking

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By The Associated Press
Friday, May 10, 2013, 7:54 p.m.
 

SACRAMENTO — Think you've heard of every way possible to quit smoking? Etta Mae Lopez came up with a new one: Slap a cop so you'll go to jail, where smoking is not allowed.

Lopez smacked Sacramento County sheriff's Deputy Matt Campoy in the face on Tuesday as he left the main jail at the end of his shift. He grabbed her and took her inside the jail, where she slapped his arm as soon as he turned her loose.

Once she was handcuffed, the 5-foot 1-inch Lopez told Campoy that she picked him because he was in uniform and she wanted to make sure she struck a law enforcement officer.

“She waited all day for a deputy to come out because she knew if she assaulted a deputy, she would go to jail and be inside long enough to quit her smoking habit,” Campoy told The Sacramento Bee.

The deputy said he tried to sidestep Lopez as he left the jail through the usual gathering of family members who linger outside the facility a few blocks from the state Capitol.

Lopez, 31, pleaded no contest to misdemeanor battery on a peace officer and was sentenced on Thursday to 63 days.

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