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Man who got naked at Oregon airport fights fine

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By The Associated Press
Friday, May 10, 2013, 7:45 p.m.
 

PORTLAND, Ore. — John Brennan, who stripped naked last year to protest a security check in Portland's airport, said he expects to lose the first round of his legal fight against a $1,000 fine.

Still, he plans to press his free speech argument in an appeal and push for effective security checks that aren't as invasive.

“I totally support airport screening,” Brennan told The Oregonian. “I just don't want it to be at the expense of my constitutional rights.”

Brennan has a court date on Tuesday before an administrative law judge. His attorney, Robert Callahan, said the free speech argument won't be allowed as Brennan fights the fine, but an appeal in the federal court system would present an opportunity.

A call to the Transportation Security Administration for comment was not immediately returned.

In April 2012, as Brennan started a business trip to California, he declined to step into a TSA body scanner.

He took off his clothes to show he was not carrying anything explosive and to get the security check over quickly, he said.

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