TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Rockefeller charity marks century of aid

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Sunday, May 12, 2013, 5:15 p.m.
 

NEW YORK — For the richest American family of its era, the goal was fittingly ambitious: “To promote the well-being of mankind throughout the world.”

With that mission, underwritten by the vast wealth of John D. Rockefeller Sr., The Rockefeller Foundation was chartered 100 years ago in Albany, N.Y. For several decades, it was the dominant foundation in the country, breaking precedent with its global outlook and helping pioneer a diligent, scientific approach to charity.

It earned the abiding gratitude of many beneficiaries, inspired imitators and — because of its power and influence — became a periodic target of criticism from both right and left.

“They were in a very small group of foundations that practiced idea-based philanthropy as opposed to just charity. They are willing to invest in ideas,” said Bradford Smith, who as president of the New York-based Foundation Center oversees research on philanthropy worldwide.

The next generation of philanthropists would be wise to study the history of The Rockefeller Foundation and its handful of peers, Smith said.

“The new money goes about this as if there wasn't any history,” he said. “I think there is a lot to learn — what worked, what didn't work.”

Now dwarfed by the largesse of Bill Gates and other contemporary philanthropists, The Rockefeller Foundation remains ambitious and well-funded and is increasingly eager to work in partnerships.

Those financial realities have prompted Rockefeller to do most of its work in partnerships rather than operating solo. Partners have included the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which Judith Rodin, The Rockefeller Foundation's president since 2005, considers a positive influence on the entire foundation sector.

“It's forced us to be even more strategic than if we didn't have it,” she said.

It is celebrating its centennial by touting an array of forward-looking projects, ranging from global disease surveillance to stronger cities to future calamities.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. 911 dispatcher hung up on caller before wounded teen’s death in June
  2. Calif. oil slick expected to dissipate
  3. Planned Parenthood requests expert study
  4. Cincy officer indicted on murder charge in fatal shooting of motorist
  5. Clinton to testify before House committee on Benghazi in October
  6. Compromise keeps highway accounts funded
  7. Undocumented alien released, suspected in crime spree
  8. University of New Hampshire language guide panned
  9. House approves bill targeting VA staffers
  10. Cruz switches targets, takes exception with IRS practices
  11. Feds accuse Philadelphia congressman Fattah of corruption