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Study: Little salt intake may pose risk as too much

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By McClatchy Newspapers
Tuesday, May 14, 2013, 7:42 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Although high salt intake increases the risk of heart disease in the general public, a new study says the health effects are less clear when salt consumption actually is reduced to below daily amounts recommended by the government.

Recent studies on the issue had “methodological flaws and limitations” and provided “insufficient and inconsistent” evidence, according to a review of the data by an expert committee of the Institute of Medicine, the independent, nonprofit health arm of the National Academy of Sciences.

“These new studies support previous findings that reducing sodium from very high-intake levels to moderate levels improves health. But they also suggest that lowering sodium intake too much may actually increase a person's risk of some health problems,” said Brian Strom, professor of public health at the University of Pennsylvania and chairman of the Institute of Medicine committee that reviewed the studies.

Most Americans average 3,400 milligrams of sodium each day, or about 1.5 teaspoons of salt. About 75 percent of the amount comes from restaurant food and processed food.

Federal dietary guidelines call for less than 2,300 milligrams daily for most people ages 14 to 50 and no more than 1,500 milligrams a day for blacks; people with hypertension, diabetes or chronic kidney disease; and adults 51 and older.

The recommendations are based on research that links higher sodium intake to high blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease.

Although the studies haven't convinced the Institute of Medicine committee to recommend altering the current dietary guidelines for sodium, the research shows that low sodium intake could cause health problems for people with mid- to late-stage heart failure who are receiving aggressive treatment for their disease.

Other literature shows possible adverse health effects of low sodium intake for people with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and pre-existing cardiovascular diseases, “the evidence on both benefit and harm is not strong enough to indicate that these subgroups should be treated differently from the general U.S. population,” the report concluded.

Still other medical spokesmen point out the critical need for salt especially of young children and older citizens, different even in different seasons.

Additional research on lower levels of salt consumption are needed to draw stronger conclusions, the report said.

 

 
 


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