TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Accord reached on bipartisan immigration measure

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Reuters
Thursday, May 16, 2013, 8:06 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan group of lawmakers in the House of Representatives said on Thursday it has reached a tentative deal to revamp the immigration system despite disputes over a temporary worker program and health care benefits that threatened to derail its efforts.

“We have essentially come to an agreement on all the major points,” Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Ky., told reporters after a two-hour meeting with six other Democratic and Republican lawmakers.

The bipartisan group has been attempting to introduce an immigration bill for years. But disputes over border security, work visa numbers and health care provisions had grown to the point that there were fears some lawmakers might be on the verge of dropping out of the long negotiations.

Yarmuth said there still were some “loose ends” but said that they were not major disagreements.

None of the lawmakers would provide details of the deal to reporters.

The group had been arguing over the “triggers” that would define when additional border security steps under the legislation would be sufficient to start legalizing some of the 11 million unauthorized foreigners, sources said.

There was disagreement over other policy issues central to an immigration bill, including the number of foreign high-tech workers who would be allowed in, as well as low-skilled construction and service industry laborers.

A separate bipartisan bill is being debated in the Senate Judiciary Committee with the goal of bringing a bill before the full Senate next month.

That panel is struggling with the work visa program in the bill and is under intense pressure from technology companies to make it easier to hire foreign workers.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Cat found alive aboard sunken boat pulled from Lake Havasu
  2. Conservation group reports pollution high in state parks
  3. Medicare patients’ outcomes improve
  4. They still have snow in Buffalo
  5. Backers of Colo. school board recall claim 90K signatures
  6. Oklahoma earthquakes shut down wells
  7. Pollard, spy for Israel in the 1980s, to be released from prison
  8. GOP says there’s no deal with Clinton on Benghazi testimony
  9. Artists’ community in Calif. reeling after girl’s death; teen boy arrested
  10. Congress embraces highway bill
  11. House skeptical but reserved on Iran deal