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1 SEAL dead, 7 injured in training crash at Kentucky fort

| Friday, May 17, 2013, 9:03 p.m.

LOUISVILLE — A Navy SEAL was killed and seven others were injured when a Humvee overturned during a training exercise at Fort Knox in Kentucky, military officials said Friday.

Lt. David Lloyd, a spokesman for the Naval Special Warfare Group Two in Virginia Beach said the Humvee — carrying six SEALS and two sailors — was part of a post convoy Wednesday night.

The Navy said the SEAL who died was Special Warfare Operator Third Class Jonathan H. Kaloust, based at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek in Fort Story, Va. The seven survivors were treated for minor injuries. The cause is under investigation.

The sailors had been conducting tactical training, but Lloyd would not release further details about the exercise because it is considered sensitive.

Naval Special Warfare Group Two oversees a variety of operations, including reconnaissance and counterterrorism.

Kaloust, 23, of Massapequa, N.Y., joined the Navy in March 2011.

The Navy has used the 170-square-mile Fort Knox as a training ground since World War II.

The Army post is about 50 miles southwest of Louisville and is home to about 14,000 military personnel, including active-duty members and reserves.

Fort Knox has been used for training exercises, including the testing of ship mock-ups before the actual vessels are sent to combat zones.

The Army Corps of Engineers considers sections of the Salt River that fall within Fort Knox as danger zones. The river is used year-round for live fire exercises involving artillery, tanks, helicopters and other weapons.

There were five units and 247 sailors in training support at the post in 2011.

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