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Pipeline bill passes House on party-line vote

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By The Associated Press
Wednesday, May 22, 2013, 8:18 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — House Republicans pushed through a bill Wednesday to bypass the president to speed approval of the Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada to Texas. Democrats criticized the legislation as a blatant attempt to allow a foreign company to avoid environmental review.

The bill was approved, 241-175, largely along party lines.

Republicans said the measure was needed to ensure that the long-delayed pipeline, first proposed in 2008, is built.

“This is the most studied pipeline in the history of mankind,” said Rep. Lee Terry, R-Neb., the bill's sponsor.

“When is enough enough?” added Rep. Jeff Denham, R-Calif. “Five years? Six years? Ten years?”

But Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., called the bill a “reckless attempt to avoid environmental review.” The bill would deem the project approved without a presidential permit, as required under current law, and with no further environmental review. The legislation would limit legal challenges to the project.

The White House says President Obama opposes the bill because it would “circumvent longstanding and proven processes” by removing the requirement for a presidential permit.

The $7 billion pipeline, proposed by Calgary-based TransCanada, would carry oil extracted from tar sands in western Canada to refineries along the Texas Gulf Coast. The 1,700-mile pipeline would travel through Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma on its way to refineries in Houston and Port Arthur, Texas.

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