Share This Page

Weakening storm still a threat

| Friday, June 7, 2013, 9:48 p.m.

RALEIGH, N.C. — The first named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season brought heavy rains but no major damage to the Southeastern United States on Friday, as it moved swiftly up the East Coast with flooding threats for as far north as New England.

After bringing rain, strong winds and even tornadoes to Florida on Thursday, Andrea was losing its tropical characteristics on Friday even as it packed maximum sustained winds of 45 mph.

Tropical storm warnings remained in effect for North Carolina and southern Virginia, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said at 5 p.m. Friday. The storm's low-level center was losing definition but remained a threat to the East Coast while “evolving into a low-pressure center,” said Darin Figurskey, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Raleigh.

The storm was centered in eastern North Carolina about 55 miles northeast of Raleigh and moving toward the Northeast at nearly 30 mph.

Forecasters say Andrea could bring high winds, heavy rainfall, and localized coastal flooding through Saturday across the mid-Atlantic states and New England. Rainfall accumulations of 2 to 4 inches are possible along the Eastern Seaboard into coastal Maine, the hurricane center said. Winds near gale force are possible along the coast from Virginia to Canada through Sunday.

Cities in the Mid-Atlantic region and Northeast were bracing for the storm. New York City activated its flash flooding plan, while a flash flood watch was issued for Southeastern Pennsylvania. The rainy weather washed out events such as NASCAR's Sprint Cup qualifying and the Washington Nationals' Friday night home game.

Authorities in Virginia blamed heavy rain from the storm's outer bands for a fatal accident on Interstate 77 in the state's western mountains. William Petty, 57, of Lexington, S.C., died when a car in which he was a passenger hydroplaned while passing a tractor-trailer. He survived the crash, only to be killed moments later when the car was struck by second tractor-trailer, authorities said.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.