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Procedural votes poised to pass, prelude to Senate immigration fight

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'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Monday, June 10, 2013, 6:12 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Senators prepared on Monday for the first votes in the full Senate on a landmark immigration bill, readying amendments on contentious issues including border security, back taxes and health care coverage.

The two votes scheduled for Tuesday afternoon are on procedural measures to allow debate to move forward on the far-reaching measure to remake immigration laws and offer eventual citizenship to some 11 million people in the nation illegally.

Both votes are expected to succeed by comfortable margins, because even some senators with deep misgivings about the bill say that the issue deserves a Senate debate.

The real fights will occur in the upcoming days and weeks, as Republican senators offer amendments they say are needed to strengthen the bill enough that they can vote in favor.

Some of these may pass; others are being dismissed by the bill's supporters as attempts to kill the bill.

One of the bill's authors, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., has said the legislation needs stronger border control measures if it is going to make it all the way to President Obama's desk. He's been supportive of an amendment announced by Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, to add new requirements on border security that need to happen before anyone can obtain a permanent residence green card.

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