TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Senate OKs farm bill

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

What's in the bill?

Federal food aid accounts for nearly 80 percent of the overall farm bill, according to a Washington Post analysis, which has led some lawmakers to suggest that the bill should be identified primarily as a food aid bill and not a bill beneficial to farmers.

79.6%: food stamps, nutrition

9.3%: crop insurance

6.1%: conservation

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Gannett News Service
Monday, June 10, 2013, 8:18 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Congress moved a step closer toward completing a sweeping five-year, $500 billion farm law on Monday, with the Senate approving legislation that would cut farm subsidies while expanding crop insurance.

The Senate voted 66-27 in favor of the package, which includes food stamps, rural economic development programs and international food aid. The attention shifts to the House, where the bill could reach the floor for debate as soon as next week.

Food-stamp funding is expected to be a key sticking point.

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, confirmed the chamber would begin discussing the farm bill later this month and vowed a “vigorous and open debate.”

“If you have ideas on how to make the bill better, bring them forward,” Boehner told his colleagues.

Last year, the Senate passed a farm bill by a wide margin in June followed by approval of legislation in the House Agriculture Committee a month later. But GOP leaders in the House were reluctant to call for a vote on either bill because they did not think they had the 218 votes necessary to pass either plan before the November election. Congress failed to pass a bill and instead voted to extend the 2008 farm law until Sept. 30.

The Senate bill passed Monday would collectively reduce overall spending by about $24 billion over 10 years, compared to about $38 billion during the same period in a House measure. Much of the savings would be realized from the consolidation of conservation programs, reductions to the food stamp program and the elimination of subsidies by $17 billion.

Senators looking for further cuts in subsidy payments have been largely unsuccessful.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. McClatchy: Emails on Clinton’s private server contain Benghazi information
  2. Feds eye use of federal dollars for ads for for-profit colleges
  3. Fetal parts in Planned Parenthood lab shown in 4th video
  4. Protesters ousted in bid to block Shell icebreaker on Portland river
  5. Highway bill on Obama’s desk extends funding 3 months
  6. OSU band song mocked Holocaust victims
  7. Only 1 co-op health program, of 23, made money in 2014, report says
  8. Christian college in Illinois to stop providing health care over Obamacare
  9. VA whistle-blowers aghast
  10. Ex-Cincy cop pleads not guilty, posts bond
  11. Wildfires force hundreds from homes in California