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Apple redesign 'biggest change' to iOS since introduction of iPhone

| Monday, June 10, 2013, 9:06 p.m.

SAN FRANCISCO — Apple on Monday announced a dramatic redesign of its iOS software, which runs the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch, that Tim Cook called the “biggest change to iOS since the introduction of the iPhone.”

The software, expected to be available to consumers in the fall, is slicker and more showy. It was shown to thunderous applause at a developers conference here.

Apple appeared much like a company on the defensive. Under assault from Google and Samsung Electronics, the company has been heavily knocked for lacking a hit parade of new products. Innovation criticisms have left Apple with a “chip on their shoulder,” says Forrester analyst Charles Golvin, adding, “There's a lot of new capabilities in both iOS and Mac OS that developers can take advantage of.”

The software update is “like getting an entirely new phone, but one you already know how to use,” said Craig Federighi, Apple senior vice-president. For example, the typography, grids and icons have all been given a face-lift.

Apple showed 10 new features to iOS, highlighted by Control Center. From the home screen, consumers can immediately jump into system settings such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi without having to swipe to another screen.

On the new iOS, the camera and photos app also got a new look.

When the camera app is open, beyond stills or video, a consumer gets two other labeled options: shooting the photo as a square picture or a panorama. It's also adding Instagram-like filters to pretty up the pictures.

Among Apple's other goodies:

• AirDrop: It's Apple's answer to Samsung's Galaxy S line of cameras, which let other Galaxy users share photos by clicking the phones together. AirDrop lets other iOS users send photos directly to each other, without opening text message or e-mail to do so.

• OS X Mavericks. It's Apple's operating system upgrade for Mac computers. One highlight is the ability to add tags to saved files that make it easier to find them during computer searches.

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