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Man claims to be target of probe into Steubenville hack

| Tuesday, June 18, 2013, 9:51 p.m.

LOUISVILLE — A central Kentucky man who goes by the online name KyAnonymous said on Tuesday he is the target of an investigation into who hacked into an Ohio high school's computer and posted a video related to the rape of a teenage girl at an alcohol-fueled party.

Hacker activists helped propel coverage of the Steubenville rape case, in part by re-posting a 12-minute Internet video showing a former student joking about the attack and the victim, a West Virginia teenager.

Deric Lostutter, 26, said he posted the video on the school's athletics boosters website, but he said he didn't hack into the site or any computers. He said someone else, who he wouldn't identify, hacked into the website.

Two football players were convicted of rape. Ma'Lik Richmond, 16, was sentenced to at least a year in the state juvenile detention system. Trent Mays, 17, was sentenced to at least two years in juvenile detention. He was also convicted of photographing the underage girl naked.

Lostutter believes he could go to prison for posting the video.

“I'm facing 25 years in prison when rapists face one,” Lostutter said.

Lostutter's attorney, Jason Flores-Williams of New Mexico, works with the Whistleblowers Defense League. He said he expected his client to be indicted in as soon as a few weeks.

“Deric is innocent, and this is a waste of taxpayer dollars. We'll be battling,” he said.

It's not clear whether he will face any charges. Kyle Edelen, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's Office in Lexington, declined to comment.

The Steubenville case gained international attention through the work of bloggers and hacker activists who alleged a cover-up to protect football players. The suspicions hinged on the presence of other students when the attack happened, including at least two who captured it on their cellphones.

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