TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Progress made toward 'artificial pancreas'

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Sunday, June 23, 2013, 5:45 p.m.
 

Doctors are reporting a major step toward an “artificial pancreas,” a device that would constantly monitor blood sugar in people with diabetes and automatically supply insulin as needed.

A key component of such a system — an insulin pump programmed to shut down if blood sugar dips too low while people are sleeping — worked as intended in a three-month study of 247 patients.

This “smart pump,” made by Minneapolis-based Medtronic Inc., is sold in Europe, and the Food and Drug Administration is reviewing it. Whether it can be programmed to mimic a real pancreas and constantly adjust insulin based on continuous readings from a blood sugar monitor requires more testing, but doctors say the study suggests that's a realistic goal.

“This is the first step in the development of the artificial pancreas,” said Dr. Richard Bergenstal, diabetes chief at Park Nicollet, a large clinic in St. Louis Park, Minn. “Before, we said it's a dream. We have the first part of it now, and I really think it will be developed.”

He led the company-sponsored study and gave results Saturday at an American Diabetes Association conference in Chicago. They were published online by the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study involved people with Type 1 diabetes, the kind usually diagnosed during childhood. About 5 percent of the 26 million Americans with diabetes have this type. Their bodies don't make insulin, a hormone needed to turn food into energy. That causes high blood sugar levels and raises the risk for heart disease and many other health problems.

Some people with the more common Type 2 diabetes, the kind linked to obesity, need insulin and might benefit from a device like an artificial pancreas. For now, though, it's aimed at people with Type 1 diabetes who must inject insulin several times a day or get it through a pump with a narrow tube that goes under the skin. The pump is about the size of a cellphone and can be worn on a belt or kept in a pocket.

The pumps give a steady amount of insulin, and patients must monitor their sugar levels and give themselves more insulin at meals or whenever needed to keep blood sugar from getting too high.

A big danger is having too much insulin in the body overnight, when blood-sugar levels naturally fall. People can go into comas, suffer seizures and even die. Parents of children with diabetes often worry so much about this that they sneak into their bedrooms at night to check their child's blood sugar monitor.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Big Bang ‘waves’ go poof under analysis
  2. Brooklyn warehouse goes up in smoke
  3. Internet rules in line for big shift
  4. ‘Drink of the Devil’ unites formerly feuding families
  5. Deportation relief applications for illegal immigrants available soon
  6. Ohio delays all 2015 executions
  7. Judge expresses doubt about constitutionality of no-fly list
  8. Chris Kyle Day declared in Texas to honor SEAL of ‘American Sniper’ movie fame
  9. States have marked drop in juvenile prison populations
  10. Colorado to clarify benefit limits over concern welfare, food stamps used to buy legal pot
  11. Prospective juror in Tsarnaev trial cites sympathy for suspect in Boston Marathon bombing