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Army to eliminate 12 combat brigades in move to slash ranks by 80,000

Bases in cross-hairs

FORT BRAGG, N.C.

The home of the 82nd Airborne Division and the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center will lose the 4th Infantry Brigade of the 82nd.

FORT STEWART, Ga.

The 3rd Infantry Division will lose its 2nd Armored Brigade. One of the division's existing brigades will remain at Fort Benning, Ga.

FORT HOOD, Texas

The Army's largest domestic base will lose the 4th Armored Brigade of the 1st Cavalry Division.

FORT BLISS, Texas

The home of the 1st Armored Division will lose the 1st Armored Brigade.

FORT CARSON, Colo.

The home of the 4th Infantry Division will lose its 3rd Armored Brigade.

FORT RILEY, Kan.

The home of the 1st Infantry Division will lose its 4th Infantry Brigade.

FORT KNOX, Ky.

The 1st Infantry Division's 3rd Infantry Brigade will be eliminated.

FORT CAMPBELL, Ky.

The home of the 101st Airborne Division will lose its 4th Infantry Brigade.

FORT DRUM, N.Y.

The 10th Mountain Division will lose its 3rd Infantry Brigade at Drum; its 4th Infantry Brigade, which is based at Fort Polk, La., will remain.

JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash.

The home of the Army's 1st Corps, whose operational focus is the Korean peninsula, will lose the 4th Stryker Brigade of the 2nd Infantry Division. The division's 1st Armored Brigade will remain in South Korea, as will the division's headquarters.

GERMANY

The 170th Heavy Brigade in Baumholder, Germany, will be eliminated, as will the 172nd Heavy Brigade in Grafenwoehr, Germany. Remaining in Europe is the 173rd Airborne Brigade, in Vicenza, Italy.

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By The Associated Press
Tuesday, June 25, 2013, 7:33 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — The Army will eliminate at least 12 combat brigades, relocate thousands of soldiers and cancel $400 million in construction projects as the first wave of federal budget cuts takes aim at military communities across the country.

In an enormous restructuring, Army leaders said on Tuesday they will slash the number of active duty combat brigades from 45 to 33, as the service moves forward with a longtime plan to cut the size of the service by 80,000. And they warned that more cuts — of as many as 100,000 more active duty, National Guard and Reserve soldiers — could be on the way if Congress allows billions of dollars in automatic budget cuts to continue next year.

The changes would eliminate brigades — which number from 3,500 to 5,000 troops — at 10 Army bases in America by 2017, including those in Texas, Kentucky, Georgia, Colorado, North Carolina, New York, Kansas and Washington. The Army will also cut thousands of other jobs, including soldiers in units that support the brigades. Two brigades in Germany have been scheduled for elimination.

Gen. Ray Odierno, Army chief of staff, said another brigade likely will be cut, but no decisions have been made.

“I know in the local communities it will have its impact,” Odierno said. “But we've done our best to reach out to them so they understand what the impacts are. We've tried to make it as small an impact as possible for as many communities as we could.”

Members of Congress, meanwhile, expressed concerns about the prospects for greater cuts down the road.

Rep. Howard P. “Buck” McKeon, R-Calif., chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, said his panel “will carefully examine the implications of this initial restructuring, but we all must understand that this is only the tip of the iceberg; much deeper cuts are still to come.”

The Army is being reduced in size from a high of about 570,000 during the peak of the Iraq war to 490,000 as part of efforts to cut the budget and reflect the country's military needs as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan end. Odierno said the potential 100,000 more troop cuts would be spread out across the active duty, Guard and Reserves, and there could be reductions in the Army's 13 aviation brigades.

While the personnel cuts may have less impact at some of the Army's larger bases such as Fort Hood, Texas, and Fort Bragg, N.C., they could be more painful for communities near smaller installations such as Fort Knox, Ky., where only one brigade is based.

The other seven U.S. bases that will lose a brigade are: Fort Bliss in Texas, Fort Campbell in Kentucky, Fort Carson in Colorado, Fort Drum in New York, Fort Riley in Kansas, Fort Stewart in Georgia, and Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington. Soldiers in the deactivated brigades would be transferred to other units.Odierno said the Army tried to spread out the cuts geographically. He said Fort Knox scored the lowest in military value, but he insisted the reduction was not the first step toward closing the base. He noted that about 4,000 civilians workers had been added there, as well as the Army's recruiting command.

The overall cut in size has been known for more than a year, and Army leaders have been working on how to manage the reduction, conducting local community meetings across the country and releasing an extensive study on the issue earlier this year.

Under the plan announced, the Army will increase the size of its infantry and armor brigades by adding another battalion, which is between 600-800 soldiers. Adding the battalion was a recommendation from commanders in Iraq and Afghanistan who said it would beef up the fighting capabilities of the brigades when they go to war.

Odierno said he continues to hope that he will be able to cut the 80,000 soldiers largely through voluntary departures. He said he believes he will have to force several hundred officers to leave to get the proper number of soldiers at various ranks. But, if the automatic cuts go forward, Odierno said he would likely have to force soldiers out of the Army.

These initial brigade cuts do not affect National Guard or Reserve units. Officials said the decisions on the cuts were based on a variety of factors including required training resources, ranges, air space and infrastructure, as well as the need to put units near leadership and headquarters units.

 

 
 


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