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House GOP: No path to citizenship for illegal immigrants

Palin's take

The ex-governor of Alaska posted comments on Facebook and Twitter:

• The Senate bill is a “sad betrayal of working class Americans of every ethnicity.”

• “ ‘Obama Calls Rubio to Congratulate Him on Immigration Reform' ... Hope it was worth 30 pieces of silver.”

• “Now we turn to watch the House. If they bless this new ‘bi-partisan' hyper-partisan devastating plan for amnesty, we'll know that both private political parties have finally turned their backs on us.”

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By The Associated Press
Sunday, June 30, 2013, 8:42 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — The Republican chairman of the House Judiciary Committee said on Sunday that any attempt at comprehensive immigration legislation cannot offer a “special pathway to citizenship” for those in the United States illegally. That approach could block the GOP's hopes of ever winning the White House, the top Democrat in the House predicted.

With last week's Senate passage of a comprehensive immigration bill, the emotionally heated and politically perilous debate is now heading toward the Republican-led House, where conservative incumbents could face primary challenges if they appear too lenient on the estimated 11 million immigrants living in the United States illegally.

Rep. Bob Goodlatte, the Virginia Republican who leads the House Judiciary Committee, said he does not foresee a proposal that could provide a simple mechanism for immigrants here illegally to earn full standing as citizens, as many Democrats have demanded. Goodlatte's committee members have been working on bills that address individual concerns but have not written a comprehensive proposal to match the Senate's effort.

The House answer would not be “a special pathway to citizenship, where people who are here unlawfully get something that people who have worked for decades to immigrate lawfully do not have,” he said.

A pathway to legal standing, similar to immigrants who have green cards, could be an option, Goodlatte said.

That approach, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said, would bring electoral doom for Republicans looking to take back the White House after the 2016 elections. Republicans, she advised, should follow the Senate lead “if they ever want to win a presidential race.”

In 2012, President Obama won re-election with the backing of 71 percent of Hispanic voters and 73 percent of Asian-American voters. A thwarted immigration overhaul could again send those voting blocs to Democrats' side.

“We wouldn't even be where we are right now had it not been that 70 percent of Hispanics voted for President Obama, voted Democratic in the last election,” said Pelosi, D-Calif. “That caused an epiphany in the Senate, that's for sure. So all of a sudden now, we have already passed comprehensive immigration reform in the Senate. That's a big victory.”

The Senate bill would provide a long and difficult pathway to citizenship for those living in the country illegally, as well as tough measures to secure the border. Conservatives have stood opposed to any pathway to full citizenship for those workers, and House lawmakers have urged a piecemeal approach to the thorny issue instead of the Senate's sweeping effort.

 

 
 


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