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Kansas judge lets abortion law stand

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By The Associated Press
Sunday, June 30, 2013, 9:12 p.m.
 

TOPEKA — The chief federal judge in Kansas refused on Sunday to temporarily block parts of a new state abortion law, including a requirement that providers' websites link to a state site with information they dispute.

U.S. District Judge Kathryn Vratil's ruling in a lawsuit filed by Planned Parenthood came after a state judge ruled on Friday in a separate challenge that Kansas could not enforce the website requirement for now. Vratil noted the previous ruling, which was filed by two doctors, in concluding that Planned Parenthood would not suffer irreparable harm if she didn't do the same.

Under the law, a provider's home page will have to provide a link to a Kansas Department of Health and Environment site and contain a statement that the state's information is “objective” and “scientifically accurate.” Abortion providers object because the state's information says a fetus can feel pain by the 20th week of pregnancy.

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has said there's no evidence for that claim.

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