TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Kansas judge lets abortion law stand

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Sunday, June 30, 2013, 9:12 p.m.
 

TOPEKA — The chief federal judge in Kansas refused on Sunday to temporarily block parts of a new state abortion law, including a requirement that providers' websites link to a state site with information they dispute.

U.S. District Judge Kathryn Vratil's ruling in a lawsuit filed by Planned Parenthood came after a state judge ruled on Friday in a separate challenge that Kansas could not enforce the website requirement for now. Vratil noted the previous ruling, which was filed by two doctors, in concluding that Planned Parenthood would not suffer irreparable harm if she didn't do the same.

Under the law, a provider's home page will have to provide a link to a Kansas Department of Health and Environment site and contain a statement that the state's information is “objective” and “scientifically accurate.” Abortion providers object because the state's information says a fetus can feel pain by the 20th week of pregnancy.

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has said there's no evidence for that claim.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Defense chief says U.S. can fly over South China Sea
  2. Cleanup begins from deadly flooding in Texas amid continuing rain
  3. Growth potential remains for online gambling
  4. Army lab sent at least 1 live batch of anthrax
  5. IRS believes identity thieves are from Russia
  6. Lawyer argues in New York court that chimpanzees have same rights as humans
  7. Charged Baltimore officers seek change of venue
  8. Worries mount of unleashed ‘Taliban 5’
  9. Dems tell DHS to end family detention
  10. Shootings, slayings surge during Memorial Day weekend in Chicago, Baltimore
  11. Administration finalizes, defends broader regulations under Clean Water Act