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Asiana may sue TV station, NTSB

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By The Associated Press
Sunday, July 14, 2013, 9:15 p.m.

Asiana Airlines said on Sunday its reputation was damaged by a report on a San Francisco TV station that used bogus and racially offensive names for four pilots on its plane that crashed earlier this month and is considering legal action.

An anchor for KTVU-TV read the names on the air Friday and then apologized after a break. The report was accompanied by a graphic with the phony names listed alongside a photo of the burned out plane. Video of the report has gone viral on the Internet since it was broadcast.

The National Transportation Safety Board has also apologized, saying a summer intern erroneously confirmed the names of the flight crew aboard Flight 214 that crashed July 6 at San Francisco International.

An Asiana statement said it's mulling legal measures against both KTVU-TV and the NTSB because the report “badly damaged” the reputation of the airline and its pilots.

It didn't say what legal measures it was considering.

Neither the station nor the NTSB commented on where the names originated.

The four pilots returned to South Korea on Saturday.

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