Share This Page

Rape charge spoils groom's wedding plans

| Sunday, July 14, 2013, 9:03 p.m.

OSSINING, N.Y. — An upstate New York math teacher was supposed to be getting married on Friday — but instead was charged with raping a 16-year-old female student.

The Journal News reports that Ossining High School teacher John Azabache was arrested when the girl contacted police. She said they had sexual relations twice between March and July, not on school property. It's not clear whether she was his student.

The attorney for the 31-year-old teacher says his client was not charged with any forcible compulsion. He says the alleged incident involves a minor who is “just under 17.”

Azabache pleaded not guilty to third-degree rape and posted $50,000 bail.

Defense lawyer Tony Castro said Azabache's wedding to Amanda Rae DeLuccia of White Plains, originally scheduled for Friday, was canceled some time ago. He would not say whether the cancellation was related to the charges.

Ossining School District Superintendent Raymond Sanchez said officials were “disturbed and appalled” by the charges. Counseling is being offered to students next week.

Sanchez said Azabache was hired in 2008 and had no prior criminal record. He has been “administratively reassigned” and barred from school grounds, the superintendent said.

Many guests were told Thursday night that the wedding was off.

“It all just came out at the last minute,” said the bride's 92-year-old grandmother, Josephine DeLuccia. “He always seemed like a nice guy. I don't know what happened. I hope they send him to jail forever.”

She spoke with her granddaughter Friday morning and said she was told, “Nanny, don't worry about me. I'm strong; I'll survive.” Amanda DeLuccia told her that she was going to hang out with friends and see a movie on what would have been her wedding night.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.