TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Rolling Stone 'glamorized' Tsarnaev

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Wednesday, July 17, 2013, 8:33 p.m.
 

NEW YORK — Sultry eyes burn into the camera lens from behind tousled curls. A scruff of sexy beard and loose T-shirt are bathed in soft, yellow light.

The close-up of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover of Rolling Stone to hit shelves Friday looks more like a young Bob Dylan or Jim Morrison than the 19-year-old who pleaded not guilty a little more than a week ago in the Boston Marathon bombing, his arm in a cast and his face swollen in court.

Has the magazine, with its roundly condemned cover, offered the world its first rock star of an alleged Islamic terrorist?

The same image of Tsarnaev was widely circulated and used by newspapers and magazines before, but in this context, it took on criticism and accusations that Rolling Stone turned the bombing defendant into something more appealing.

“I can't think of another instance in which one has glamorized the image of an alleged terrorist. This is the image of a rock star. This is the image of someone who is admired, of someone who has a fan base, of someone we are critiquing as art,” said Kathleen Hall Jamieson, a communications professor and the director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.

Public outrage was swift, including hard words from the Boston mayor, bombing survivors and the governor of Massachusetts. At least five retailers with strong New England ties — CVS, Tedeschi Food Stores and the grocery chain the Roche Bros. — said they would not sell the issue that features an in-depth look into how a charming, well-liked teen took a dark turn toward radical Islam. Stop & Shop and Walgreens followed.

In a brief statement offering condolences to bombing survivors and the loved ones of the dead, Rolling Stone said, “The fact that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is young, and in the same age group as many of our readers, makes it all the more important for us to examine the complexities of this issue and gain a more complete understanding of how a tragedy like this happens.”

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. FAA reviews contingency plans, security policies after Chicago air traffic control center fire
  2. IRS not wholly tracking dodgers, report finds
  3. Cost of taking fight to ISIS pegged at $2.4B to $6.8B a year
  4. Qantas matches biggest plane, longest air route
  5. Supreme Court blocks start of early Ohio voting
  6. Test cheating scheme in Atlanta goes to trial
  7. Intruder made it to East Room of White House, overpowered Secret Service officer
  8. NSA relies on 1981 executive order signed by Reagan
  9. Police link 2 more cases to University of Virginia suspect
  10. Some La. hospitals bill rape victims; legislators vow to end policy
  11. Schools grapple with immigration overload
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.