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Military braces for more squeezes in furloughs, layoffs, pay cuts

AP
In this photo taken July 17, 2013, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, flanked by Air Force personnel, walks down the rear ramp of a C-17 at Joint Base Charleston near Charleston, S.C., on the last day of a three-day trip to visit bases in the Carolinas and Florida. When Hagel told civilian Department of Defense workers on the base that job furloughs, that have forced a 20% pay cut on most of the military's civilian workforce, will likely continue next year, and may get even worse, the audience softly gasped in surprise and gave a few depressed low whistles. He said that if the department has to absorb another $52 billion in cuts next year because of the federal sequester, there will likely be layoffs instead of furloughs. (AP Photo/Bruce Smith)

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By The Associated Press
Sunday, July 21, 2013, 9:09 p.m.
 

JOINT BASE CHARLESTON, S.C. — The audience gasped in surprise and gave a few low whistles as Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel delivered the news that furloughs, which have forced a 20 percent pay cut on most of the military's civilian workforce, probably will continue next year, and it might get worse.

“Those are the facts of life,” Hagel told about 300 Defense Department employees, most of them middle-aged civilians, at an Air Force reception hall on a military base in Charleston.

Layoffs also are possible for the department's civilian workforce of more than 800,000 employees, Hagel said, if Congress fails to stem the cuts in the next budget year, which starts Oct. 1.

On the heels of the department's first furlough day, and in three days of visits with members of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps, Hagel played the unenviable role of messenger to a frustrated and fearful workforce coping with the inevitability of a spending squeeze at the end of more than a decade of constant and costly war.

The fiscal crunch lays bare the politically unpopular need to bring runaway military costs in line with most of the rest of the American public that has struggled economically for years.

“Everybody's bracing for the impact,” Army Master Sgt. Trey Corrales said after Hagel spoke with soldiers during a quick stop at Fort Bragg, N.C.

Corrales' wife, a military civilian employee, is among those furloughed, and they have canceled their cable TV service and started carpooling to work to save money.

“The effects of the economy have started to hit the military,” Corrales said. “It was late in coming to us.”

The furloughs have affected about 650,000 civilian employees but have slowed health care and other services for the uniformed military, which has stopped some training missions and faces equipment shortages because of the budget shortfalls.

Troops were told this month that they no longer will receive extra pay for deployments to 18 former global hot spots no longer considered danger zones.

Troops are facing force reductions, and the Army alone has announced plans to trim its ranks by 80,000 over the next five years.

Officials agree that the military has undergone cycles of expanding and shrinking of the force over generations.

Hagel said this time is different and worse, however, because of what he described as a “very dark cloud” of uncertainty hanging over the Pentagon as Congress considers whether to reverse $52 billion in spending reductions set to go into effect in 2014.

At the Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Fla., Hagel told an estimated 100 civilians gathered in a bustling jet maintenance hangar that the military had not been prepared for the $37 billion in cuts that took effect this year, forcing the furloughs.

While he said he was deeply sorry for the strain the crunch has put on families, Hagel said he would not slash troops' training or other readiness budgets any further to prevent huge gaps in national security.

 

 
 


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