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Obama's approval rating at 2-year low

| Monday, July 22, 2013, 9:27 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Stung by Americans' persistent worries about the economy and a capital gripped by controversy and gridlock, President Obama is suffering his lowest job approval numbers in nearly two years, according to a new McClatchy-Marist poll.

The plummeting numbers — still higher than those of Congress — arrive after weeks of rising gasoline prices, revelations about domestic spying and turmoil in the Middle East.

Obama will deliver the first of a series of speeches on Wednesday aimed at offering his vision for boosting economic growth, even as the new poll found that just 37 percent of the respondents approved of his handling of the economy, while 56 percent disapproved.

Overall, the poll found Obama's job approval at 41 percent last week, a sharp drop from April's 50 percent and his worst showing in the poll since 39 percent in September 2011. Forty-eight percent disapproved in the latest poll, up from April's 46 percent.

Obama won re-election in November with 51 percent of the popular vote.

“Clearly six months into his second term there's been falloff across the board. It's not like one group bailed on him,” said Lee Miringoff, director of the Marist Institute for Public Opinion at Marist College in New York, which conducted the poll.

About his only solace is that the approval rating of congressional Republicans, who control the House of Representatives, sank to 22 percent. One-third of registered voters approved of congressional Democrats' performance.

The dismal Washington numbers reflect “the ongoing, cumulative effect of those issues which have not been resolved,” and no solution is in sight, Miringoff said.

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