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Shipwreck tantalizes researchers

AP - An anemone is living on top of a musket that lies across other muskets at the site of a shipwreck in the Gulf of Mexico about 170 miles from Galveston, Texas.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AP</em></div>An anemone is living on top of a musket that lies across other muskets at the site of a shipwreck in the Gulf of Mexico about 170 miles from Galveston, Texas.
AP - Oxidized copper hull sheathing is visible on the bow of a wrecked ship in the Gulf of Mexico about 170 miles from Galveston, Texas.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AP</em></div>Oxidized copper hull sheathing is visible on the bow of a wrecked ship in the Gulf of Mexico about 170 miles from Galveston, Texas.

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, July 25, 2013, 7:00 p.m.
 

GALVESTON, Texas — Marine archaeologists are excited about the discovery of what may be a well-preserved 200-year-old shipwreck more than three-quarters of a mile below the Gulf of Mexico.

Researchers led by a team from Texas State University in San Marcos are calling it the deepest shipwreck — 4,363 feet down — that archaeologists have systematically investigated in the Gulf of Mexico and in North America.

The remains about 170 miles southeast of Galveston are “tantalizing,” researchers say, because of the degree of preservation. Undersea images show an outline of an 84-foot-long, 26-foot-wide wooden hull and copper-clad sailing vessel, possibly with two masts.

“This site has such an amazing rate of preservation that these artifacts are in astoundingly wonderful condition, and they truly provide a physical connection with our shared past,” said principal investigator Fritz Hanselmann, of the Texas State University Meadows Center for Water and the Environment.

But the wreck is so deep that divers can't explore it. So, this week, researchers have used remote-controlled undersea vehicles to examine the remains and recover items with robot-like arms — things such as ceramics, liquor bottles and an octant, a navigational tool. Other items spotted among the wreckage are muskets, swords, cannons and clothing.

Hanselmann anticipated the artifacts will help answer questions about the vessel's age, function and cultural affiliation.

“Not only do we learn more about the ship itself, but we are able to understand more about the crew, their activities and the bigger picture of maritime activity in the Gulf of Mexico region,” he said.

A Shell Oil Co. survey crew notified federal Interior Department officials in 2011 that its sonar had detected something resembling a shipwreck. A year later, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration vessel examining seafloor habitat and naturally occurring gas seepage used a remote-controlled vehicle to briefly look at the wreck. Besides determining the dimensions, the examination showed it to be undisturbed and likely an early 19th century watercraft.

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