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Florida gunman spoke of his anger

| Sunday, July 28, 2013, 9:21 p.m.

HIALEAH, Fla. — The gunman who went on a shooting rampage at his South Florida apartment building, killing six people, was a lonely man who spoke about having pent-up anger, those who knew him said on Sunday.

Pedro Vargas, 42, lived on the fourth floor of a barren, concrete apartment complex in the Miami suburb of Hialeah with his elderly mother. He rarely spoke with others there and confided to a man who worked out at the same gym that he liked to work out his anger by lifting weights and trying to get big.

“He'd just say this was the only thing that would keep him normal, pulling out all the anger in the gym,” Jorge Bagos said.

Bagos said the gunman was frustrated by bad experiences with women and the loss of all of his hair from using steroids.

On Friday night, Vargas set a combustible liquid on fire in his apartment, sending the unit into flames, police said. Building manager Italo Pisciotti and his wife went running toward the smoke. Vargas opened his door and shot and killed both of them, said Lt. Carl Zogby, a Hialeah police spokesman.

Vargas went back into his apartment and began firing from his balcony. One of the shots killed Carlos Javier Gavilanes, 33, who neighbors said was returning home from his son's boxing practice.

Vargas then stormed into a third-story apartment, where he shot and killed a family of three: Patricio Simono, 64; Merly Niebles, 51; and her 17-year-old daughter.

For eight hours, police followed and exchanged gunfire with Vargas throughout the five-story apartment complex as terrified residents took cover in bathrooms and huddled with relatives.

In the final hours, Vargas took two people captive in a fifth-story unit. Police attempted to negotiate with him, but the talks fell apart, and a SWAT team swarmed in, killing Vargas and rescuing both hostages.

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