TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Rare mammal species olinguito discovered

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013, 6:48 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Imagine a mini-raccoon with a teddy bear face that is so cute it's hard to resist, let alone overlook. But somehow science did — until now.

Researchers announced on Thursday a rare discovery of a new species of mammal called the olinguito. The reddish-brown, racoon-like animal is about 14 inches long with an equally long tail and weighs about 2 pounds.

It belongs to a grouping of large creatures that include dogs, cats and bears.

The critter leaps through the trees of mountainous forests of Ecuador and Colombia at night, according to a Smithsonian researcher who has spent the past decade tracking them.

But the adorable olinguito shouldn't have been so hard to find. One of them once lived in the Smithsonian-run National Zoo in Washington for a year in a case of mistaken identity.

“It's been kind of hiding in plain sight for a long time” despite its extraordinary beauty, said Kristofer Helgen, the Smithsonian's curator of mammals.

The little zoo critter, named Ringerl, was mistaken for a sister species, the olingo. Before she died in 1976, Ringerl was shipped from zoo to zoo in Louisville, Tucson, Salt Lake City, Washington and New York City to try to get it to breed with other olingos.

She wouldn't.

“It turns out she wasn't fussy,” Helgen said. “She wasn't the right species.”

The discovery is described in a study in the journal ZooKey.

Helgen first figured olinguitos were different from olingos when he was looking at pelts and skeletons in a museum. He later led a team to South America in 2006.

“When we went to the field, we found it in the very first night,” said study co-author Roland Kays of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. “It was almost like it was waiting for us.”

It's hard to figure how olingos and onlinguitos were confused for each other.

“How is it different? In almost every way that you can look at it,” Helgen said.

Olinguitos are smaller, have shorter tails, a rounder face, tinier ears and darker, bushier fur, he said.

“It looks kind of like a fuzzball ... kind of like a cross between a teddy bear and a house cat,” Helgen said.

It eats fruit and has one baby at a time.

While new species are found regularly, usually they are tiny things like insects and not mammals, the warm-blooded advanced class of animals that have hair, live births and mammary glands in females.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Last 4 hostages freed in suburban Chicago
  2. Cleanup follows heavy storms in Phoenix area
  3. Contraception, abstinence push U.S. teen birthrates to historic lows
  4. Beheading doesn’t deter U.S., who launches new airstrikes
  5. Florida looks good: Farmer’s Almanac predicts ‘super-cold’ winter, above-average snow for Northeast
  6. Navy boots 34 in cheating scandal
  7. Scathing report says college trustees fail in mission
  8. Mortgage deal isn’t likely to cost $17B
  9. More states pick up tab for ACT exams
  10. WASHINGTON Gay marriage on hold …
  11. Poll: Common Core educational standards loses support
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.