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Fort Hood police officer: Army Maj. Nidal Hasan tried to kill me

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By The Associated Press

Published: Friday, Aug. 16, 2013, 7:36 p.m.

FORT HOOD, Texas — With the gunman standing over her, Fort Hood police Officer Kimberly Munley tried to fire her weapon as she lay bleeding on the ground. Nothing happened.

The shooter then kicked the gun from her hand. But then his gun malfunctioned, and he stumbled back as one of Munley's fellow officers yelled, “Drop your weapon!” The officer fired, and the gunman fell.

Munley recalled that while testifying Friday at the military trial of Maj. Nidal Hasan, who is accused of killing 13 people that day at the Texas military base in November 2009. The Army psychiatrist is accused of wounding more than 30 others.

When asked if the man who tried to kill her was in the courtroom, Munley — who was shot three times — pointed to Hasan.

Munley told jurors that she spotted someone in Army clothing with a gun after arriving at the scene, a medical building on the post that had been crowded with soldiers preparing to deploy. She then heard her colleague, Sgt. Mark Todd, order the man to drop his weapon.

Munley said she saw a red laser flash across her eyes, and she began shooting. She said the gunman was running and firing in her direction, so she took cover behind a building.

“I realized he was not slowing down whatsoever,” she testified. “He rounded the corner and within 8 feet or so, we blindly began to exchange fire.

“When I fell to the ground, the shooter was closer to me,” she said. “I tried to continue to fire. My weapon would not fire. Some sort of malfunction in my weapon. I see him standing over me, trying to shoot me.”

She said Hasan then kicked the weapon out of her hand. She crawled, trying to get her gun, as Hasan was trying to fix his weapon, when she heard Todd again yell at the gunman. Todd then fired his gun, and Hasan fell, Munley said.

She scooted herself up a wall to “try to put pressure on what I know is an arterial wound.”

Hasan, who is acting as his own attorney, declined to question Munley, which has largely been his strategy since the trial began last week.

His lack of defense so far has allowed prosecutors to call more than 70 witnesses, indicating that the trial could wrap up far sooner than the monthslong timeline originally announced by the judge, Col. Tara Osborn.

Prosecutors told Osborn on Friday that they have about 15 to 25 witnesses left, likely depending on what evidence and witnesses the judge allows.

Such evidence includes references to Hasan Akbar, a Muslim soldier sentenced to death for attacking fellow soldiers in Kuwait during the 2003 Iraq invasion. Prosecutor Col. Steve Henricks told a skeptical Osborn that Hasan had shown interest in Akbar's case and that prosecutors wanted to prove Hasan's attack was a “copycat.”

 

 
 


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