TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Lawmakers ask Centers for Disease Control about Camp Lejeune's toxic water

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Friday, Aug. 16, 2013, 8:27 p.m.
 

RALEIGH — A bipartisan group of lawmakers is urging the Centers for Disease Control to complete a new, comprehensive report on the health effects of toxic tap water at the Marine Corps base at Camp Lejeune.

The lawmakers want the agency to investigate whether people were exposed to airborne toxins inside buildings once contaminated wells at the North Carolina base were closed in 1985.

And they asked the agency to look into the feasibility of a “cancer incidence study” for Camp Lejeune.

The four senators and two representatives were reacting to news that the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, a division of the CDC, intends to issue a less comprehensive report than the one it released in 1997. The original public health assessment was withdrawn four years ago because of incomplete data.

The lawmakers said they are concerned the agency will ignore “the potential for harmful exposures via inhalation” in the decade and a half since contaminated wells at the coastal North Carolina base were taken offline.

“Public Health Assessments are essential and critical to ensuring full and complete information about exposures to hazardous substances is available to the public,” the six legislators — Sens. Richard Burr and Kay Hagan, both of North Carolina; Sens. Marco Rubio and Bill Nelson, both of Florida; and Reps. Dennis Ross of Florida and John Dingell of Michigan — wrote to CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden on Aug. 9.

The lawmakers included the request for a cancer study in a follow-up letter on Friday.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Despite U.S. dollars and bombs, effort failing to squash ISIS
  2. Global lion population falling primarily because of loss of habitat, experts say
  3. Feds accuse Philadelphia congressman Fattah of corruption
  4. VA whistle-blowers aghast
  5. Fetal parts in Planned Parenthood lab shown in 4th video
  6. Feds eye use of federal dollars for ads for for-profit colleges
  7. Christian college in Illinois to stop providing health care over Obamacare
  8. Hope dims for Fla. teens lost at sea
  9. Highway bill on Obama’s desk extends funding 3 months
  10. Piece of plant found on island on way to France for analysis
  11. Defense chief approves arming more troops at soft sites