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British graffiti artist Banksy art up for auction

AP
Julien's Auctions released this photo of the Banksy graffiti mural titled, 'Flower Girl,' which formerly occupied a gas station in Los Angeles.

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By Reuters
Sunday, Aug. 18, 2013, 9:15 p.m.
 

LOS ANGELES — A mural by British graffiti artist Banksy that was painted on a Los Angeles gas station wall will be auctioned off in December and is expected to fetch upward of $150,000, Julien's Auctions said.

The mural, titled “Flower Girl,” was done on a brick wall in 2008. Measuring 9 by 8 feet, the mural shows the silhouette of a girl looking up at a closed-circuit television camera sprouting from a vine.

It is estimated to fetch between $150,000 and $300,000 as Banksy has become a coveted contemporary artist.

“Banksy is not only provocative, but quite entertaining. It makes it quite fun to offer his art along with so many other great artists of our time,” Martin Nolan, executive director of Julien's Auctions, said.

“Flower Girl” will be the only mural on the block on Dec. 5 in Beverly Hills, Calif., as part of Julien's Auctions “Street Art” collection. Other works in the lot will include canvases and paper pieces by street artists such as Risk, Indie 184 and MearOne.

Banksy is a pseudonym for an elusive British graffiti artist who first emerged in Bristol, England, as part of an underground group of artists. He has become known for his trademark spray-paint stencils that offer social commentary.

He intentionally hides his identity and real name, but verifies his works by featuring them on his website.

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