TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

4 cleared of Libya security failures

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

From Wire Reports
Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013, 7:15 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Four State Department officials have been cleared of security failures that led to an attack last year on a diplomatic outpost in Benghazi, Libya, that killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens, authorities said Tuesday.

State spokeswoman Marie Harf said the officials, who held senior positions at the Bureau of Diplomatic Security and the Bureau of Near East Affairs during the Sept. 11, 2012, attack, will be reassigned to new jobs.

She said an internal State review concluded “there was no breach of duty” by any of the four, who have been on paid administrative leave for months.

The State Department is not investigating any other employees. But the Benghazi attack has been under intense scrutiny by some House Republicans who have suggested the Obama administration is trying to cover up the circumstances and aftermath of the attack that left Stevens and three other Americans dead.

A review in December by the independent Benghazi Accountability Review Board described a security vacuum in Libya after rebel forces toppled the decades-long regime of strongman Moammar Gadhafi. It singled out the State Department's Bureau of Diplomatic Security and the Bureau of Near East Affairs for lacking cooperation and being confused over protection at the diplomatic post in Benghazi.

Among the four officials are Eric Boswell, assistant secretary of State for diplomatic security; Charlene Lamb, deputy assistant secretary responsible for embassy security; and Raymond Maxwell, deputy assistant secretary of State who oversaw the Maghreb nations of Libya, Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco. The fourth official's identity was not disclosed.

The announcement drew a sharp rebuke from House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa, who has been leading a congressional probe of the government's response to the attack.

“Instead of accountability, the State Department offered a charade that included false reports of firings and resignations and now ends in a game of musical chairs where no one misses a single day on the State Department payroll,” Issa, R-Calif., said in a statement.

He called the government's response to the attacks “more of a public relations strategy than a measured response to a failure in leadership.”

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Ohio got DEA approval to import lethal-injection drugs
  2. Lion cubs jump hurdles in Gaza Strip in journey to Jordan sanctuary
  3. Santorum charter flight tab broke $400K
  4. Suspect in San Francisco pier shooting was deported 5 times, federal authorities say
  5. Solar-powered plane crosses Pacific Ocean
  6. Missouri spells out eating disorder coverage for insurers
  7. Record-breaking solar-powered plane lands in Hawaii after flight from Japan
  8. Hiring freeze, budget cuts put West Virginia on better footing
  9. Northwest wildfire season begins early
  10. Diebold, heirs of Prohibition agent Ness squabble over stock find
  11. Lawsuit in deaths of 19 firefighters in Arizona yields little cash