TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Indiana sued over abortion pill measure by Planned Parenthood

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By Reuters
Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, 8:18 p.m.
 

INDIANAPOLIS — Planned Parenthood on Thursday filed a federal challenge to a new Indiana law requiring clinics that administer the so-called abortion pill to have full surgical facilities, a requirement it says would halt abortion services in a central Indiana clinic.

Under the law, Planned Parenthood would have to upgrade its clinic in Lafayette, Ind., to surgical standards or stop administering RU-486, commonly called the abortion pill, the nonprofit said in a lawsuit filed in Indianapolis federal court.

Imposing surgical facility requirements on clinics where no surgery is performed “is not only unreasonable, it is utterly irrational,” Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky said in the lawsuit, which seeks a federal court injunction.

Legislators supporting the law that took effect July 1 have said it would protect women's health. It requires clinics providing nonsurgical abortions to have separate procedure, recovery and scrub rooms like surgical centers starting Jan. 1.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. GOP hopefuls take on illegal immigration in debate preview
  2. Jury eyes execution as option for Colorado movie theater shooter
  3. Planned Parenthood escapes punishment on pair of fronts
  4. Suspect in Memphis police officer’s killing surrenders
  5. U.S. judge blocks extradition of Russian to Poland over looted art
  6. 2 women advance to final phase of Army Ranger training
  7. Heavy rain, flooding soak Tampa Bay area
  8. Texas Attorney General Paxton accused of lying to investors
  9. GOP claims enough votes to reject Iran nuclear deal
  10. Hitchhiking robot’s journey west cut short in Philly
  11. Obama orders steeper emission cuts from power plants