TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Simpler medication, no co-pays linked to big drop in hypertension

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Sunday, Aug. 25, 2013, 5:48 p.m.
 

CHICAGO — Research suggests giving patients easier-to-take medicine and medical visits with no co-pay can help drive down high blood pressure, a major contributor to poor health and untimely deaths.

Those efforts were part of a big health care provider's eight-year program, involving more than 300,000 patients with high blood pressure. At the beginning, less than half had brought their blood pressure under control. That increased to a remarkable 80 percent, well above the national average, the researchers said.

The research involved Kaiser Permanente in Northern California, a network of 21 hospitals and 73 doctors' offices, which makes coordinating treatment easier than in independent physicians' offices.

The number of heart attacks and strokes among Northern California members fell substantially during about the same time as the 2001-09 study. Dr. Marc Jaffe, the lead author and leader of a Kaiser heart disease risk reduction program, said it's impossible to know whether the blood pressure program can be credited for those declines, but he thinks it at least contributed.

Reductions continued even after the study ended; in 2011, 87 percent of approximately 350,000 Kaiser patients had recommended blood pressure levels.

The study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

“What's unique about this is the sheer scale of what they've done,” said Dr. Goutham Rao, a family medicine specialist at NorthShore University HealthSystem, a group of four hospitals in Chicago's northern suburbs. Rao is involved in research on reducing obesity and other risks for heart disease.

“If we were able to keep everyone's blood pressure under control in the United States, the number of new strokes and heart attacks would go down just exponentially,” he said.

High blood pressure affects 1 in 3 adults, or 67 million people, and the condition caused or contributed to more than 348,000 deaths in 2009, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Normal blood pressure is considered a reading of less than 120 over 80; high blood pressure is 140 over 90 or higher. High blood pressure typically causes no symptoms, at least initially, and can sometimes be managed with a healthy lifestyle, including physical activity plus avoiding salty foods, heavy drinking and excess weight. But two or more prescription drugs are often needed to bring high blood pressure under control.

In 2001, the Kaiser group introduced a systemwide program involving its 1,800 primary care doctors to tackle the problem. It established a registry of adult members with high blood pressure, based on medical records.

At the start, about 44 percent of 235,000 registry patients had their blood pressure under control. The registry grew, and by 2009, the portion under control reached 80 percent of 353,000 patients. That compares with 64 percent of people with blood pressure problems nationwide.

Two features likely played a big role in the program's success: In 2005, the region started using a single generic pill combining two common blood pressure drugs, lisinopril and a diuretic. The pill is less expensive than taking the two medicines separately and easier to use.

And in 2007, the program began offering free follow-up visits with medical assistants, rather than doctors, checking blood pressure readings.

In addition to not charging a co-pay, these brief visits were available at more flexible times, increasing chances that patients would stick with the program.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Global heat records tumble once again
  2. Red tide threatens Florida economy
  3. Dog gone for 4 months found 3,000 miles from home
  4. Artificial sweeteners possible contributors to diabetes, obesity
  5. Strong rip currents kill 2 men in Ocean City
  6. Largest predator — a terrifying, swimming dinosaur — rediscovered
  7. FBI, federal marshals join manhunt for survivalist accused of ambushing troopers
  8. Astronauts to hitch U.S. ride to space station
  9. House panel OKs move to split Amtrak, focus on profitable Northeast Corridor
  10. Improved economy drives first decline in the national poverty rate in 7 years
  11. House OKs deal to avert Oct. 1 shutdown, training of Syrian rebels
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.