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Zimmerman's wife pleads guilty to lying during bond hearing

| Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013, 7:57 p.m.

SANFORD, Fla. — Shellie Zimmerman, the wife of George Zimmerman, pleaded guilty on Wednesday morning to a less-serious form of perjury in a deal that will require her to serve one year of probation.

Circuit Judge Marlene Alva accepted the plea during a brief hearing at the Seminole County criminal courthouse in Sanford.

It was a negotiated deal, designed to avoid a felony conviction. The 26-year-old was a nursing student nearly done with her schooling at the time of her arrest. Had she been convicted of perjury — a felony crime — she would have been banned from applying to become a nurse for three years.

The deal also requires her to write a letter of apology to Circuit Judge Kenneth Lester Jr., the judge to whom she was accused of lying, and to serve 100 hours of community service.

The official charge filed against Shellie Zimmerman was perjury during an official proceeding — of lying during one of her husband's bond hearings last year. That's a third-degree felony, which carries a possible five-year prison term.

She told Lester that she and her husband were broke when, in fact, they had taken in more than $130,000 in donations in just over two weeks from Internet donors wanting to help Zimmerman defend himself against a murder charge for killing Trayvon Martin.

However, she had no prior criminal record, and Assistant State Attorney John Guy of Jacksonville agreed to allow her to plead guilty to the lesser charge of perjury in an unofficial proceeding. That's a misdemeanor, punishable by a maximum of 12 months in jail.

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