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Gettysburg College to show Warhol Polaroids

| Friday, Aug. 30, 2013, 1:36 a.m.

GETTYSBURG — Campbell's soup cans and brightly colored celebrity faces often come to mind when the name Andy Warhol is mentioned.

But when Gettysburg College senior Emily Francisco learned her school owned a collection of 153 Polaroids and photographs by Warhol, she set out to display the lesser-known works.

Warhol, who often carried a Polaroid camera with him, used his snapshots as sketches to complete paintings later on. He took tens of thousands of Polaroid photographs throughout his career.

“I chose from a list of a mix between Polaroids and silver gelatin prints,” Francisco said. “Hopefully, people will be able to understand the nature and instant process of the photos when they see them.”

In 2008, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts divided some of the artist's photos and offered them to university galleries around the country, including Gettysburg College's Schmucker Gallery, gallery Director Shannon Egen said.

Egen waited to display the photos until the right time and student came along.

Francisco, who spent time working for the Philadelphia Art Museum, visited the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh as part of her final research for the exhibit.

She chose six female and six male portraits for display. Subjects include dancer Martha Graham and Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky.

“I want to develop a relationship between the celebrity interest Warhol had and the everyday person as their own celebrity,” Francisco said. “He loved celebrities, but it is different from everything else he has done.”

The display will include four portraits of objects, including one titled “The Last Supper.”

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