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Files confirm military tested bin Laden's DNA

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013, 8:48 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Secret budget documents show that a U.S. military laboratory in Afghanistan analyzed DNA from Osama bin Laden's corpse and confirmed his identity shortly after he was killed by a Navy SEAL team.

The Pentagon denied more than a year ago that it had any records of the tests in a response to a Freedom of Information Act request filed by The Associated Press a day after President Obama announced bin Laden's death.

The Washington Post reported that classified intelligence budget files provided by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden state that a forensic intelligence laboratory run by the Defense Intelligence Agency performed the DNA testing. The Post reported that the tests “provided a conclusive match.”

The AP's request for records submitted on May 2, 2011, included DNA and facial recognition tests performed to ensure the body was bin Laden's, all videos and photographs taken during the raid on bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, the death certificate and other records related to the mission.

The AP reported in July that the nation's top special operations commander, Adm. William McRaven, had ordered files about the raid purged from Defense Department computers and sent to the CIA, where they more easily could be shielded from ever being made public.

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