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In gifts from foreign leaders, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton beats president

| Friday, Aug. 30, 2013, 5:30 p.m.
FILE - In this June 27, 2012 file-pool photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton receives a gift from Finnish Foreign Minister Erkki Tuomioja at the Government Banquet Hall in Helsinki, Finland. of a gold necklace called the King Abdul Aziz Order of Merit, the country's highest honor, from Saudi King Abdullah at the start of their bilateral meeting at the King's Farm in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton has outpaced President Barack Obama when it comes to lavish gifts from foreign leaders. State Department documents released Friday show Clinton got gold jewelry worth a half-million dollars from King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, while Obama’s most expensive gift was a $16,500 gold-plated clock from Crown Prince Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud, the Saudi defense minister. The gifts were among a bounty of vases, watches, art work and other items given to top U.S. officials in 2012, according to the department’s Office of Protocol, which catalogs the gifts and publishes an annual listing. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, Pool)

WASHINGTON — Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton outpaced President Obama last year in receiving lavish gifts from foreign leaders.

Clinton received gold jewelry worth a half-million dollars from King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia. The State Department said the gift included a necklace bracelet, ring and earrings. The white gold was adorned with teardrop rubies and diamonds.

Obama's most expensive gift was a $16,500 gold-plated clock from Crown Prince Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud, the Saudi defense minister.

Obama, a big sports fan, scored a red, white and blue basketball from — and autographed by — Chinese President Xi Jinping. British Prime Minister David Cameron and his wife, Samantha, gave Obama a customized Dunlop tennis table with United States and United Kingdom decals and paddles worth $1,100.

The gifts were among a bounty of vases, watches, artwork and other items given to the Obama family and top U.S. officials in 2012, according to the department's Office of Protocol, which catalogs the gifts and publishes an annual listing.

Clinton and Obama won't pocket the swag. Under law, most gifts must go to the National Archives or General Services Administration, unless recipients reimburse the Treasury for them.

Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny gave Obama a package of gifts worth $7,246.19 that included a certificate of Obama's Irish heritage, two silver shamrock charm bracelets and a lamb's wool scarf and blanket.

Myanmar President Thein Sein offered gifts of jewelry for the first lady, Michelle Obama, and the Obama daughters, Malia and Sasha. The first lady was given a $4,200 pearl necklace with a gold and diamond clasp. The Obama daughters received two flower brooches of pearl, diamond and gold valued at $4,440.

Britain's Samantha Cameron gave the first lady a cashmere scarf by J. Saunders worth $480.

There were gifts that could be consumed and those from display.

Clinton got $560 worth of cognac from Russian President Vladimir Putin. Obama received a saber with a 34-inch blade and a silver filigree handle from Mongolian President Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj.

Vice President Joe Biden got a silver knife and chopsticks with silver ends from Mongolia's prime minister and a female bare-breasted bust from Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

The State Department said its gift listings sometimes run late because of processing.

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