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Postal Service to offer buyouts

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By the numbers

The financially strapped USPS has used early-retirement incentives repeatedly in recent years.

• 25,500 front-office clerks, mail handlers, drivers and other employees accepted such offers in 2012.

• 34,000 Postal Service employees have retired during the current fiscal year through July, with many taking early outs.

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By The Washington Post

Published: Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, 6:24 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Continuing its cost-cutting efforts, the Postal Service is planning to offer early retirement to thousands of employees at the management and executive levels, according to a group with knowledge of the discussions.

The Postal Board of Governors began considering pricing issues on Thursday, including a potential rate increase that's alarming mailers of newspapers and magazines, advertising and other bulk correspondence.

The mailing industry has mounted a public relations offensive against what it says could be a request for a steep rate increase, arguing to the board and in the media that raising prices is premature and would hurt their business and, ultimately, the Postal Service.

Board spokesman David Partenheimer said that members reached no decision Thursday and that they will continue listening to stakeholders, with a possible vote at their next meeting, in late September.

Regarding the early retirement offers, the National Association of Postal Supervisors (NAPS) said on its website that USPS will notify eligible workers starting Sept. 16. The retirements would take effect at the end of December for Civil Service Retirement System participants, and at the end of January for workers applying for the Federal Employees Retirement System, NAPS said.

 

 
 


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