TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Postal Service to offer buyouts

By the numbers

The financially strapped USPS has used early-retirement incentives repeatedly in recent years.

• 25,500 front-office clerks, mail handlers, drivers and other employees accepted such offers in 2012.

• 34,000 Postal Service employees have retired during the current fiscal year through July, with many taking early outs.

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Washington Post
Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, 6:24 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Continuing its cost-cutting efforts, the Postal Service is planning to offer early retirement to thousands of employees at the management and executive levels, according to a group with knowledge of the discussions.

The Postal Board of Governors began considering pricing issues on Thursday, including a potential rate increase that's alarming mailers of newspapers and magazines, advertising and other bulk correspondence.

The mailing industry has mounted a public relations offensive against what it says could be a request for a steep rate increase, arguing to the board and in the media that raising prices is premature and would hurt their business and, ultimately, the Postal Service.

Board spokesman David Partenheimer said that members reached no decision Thursday and that they will continue listening to stakeholders, with a possible vote at their next meeting, in late September.

Regarding the early retirement offers, the National Association of Postal Supervisors (NAPS) said on its website that USPS will notify eligible workers starting Sept. 16. The retirements would take effect at the end of December for Civil Service Retirement System participants, and at the end of January for workers applying for the Federal Employees Retirement System, NAPS said.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Graham rejects GOP Benghazi report as ‘garbage’
  2. Boy with fake gun shot by officer dies
  3. Tension, anxiety mount in Ferguson as grand jury ruling awaited
  4. Obama defends executive action on illegals
  5. Vatican prosecutor did not report abusive Catholic priest
  6. 32 horses killed in stable fire near Chicago
  7. Tufts center study: It costs $2.6B to get drug to market
  8. Florida man who ambushed police held anti-government beliefs
  9. Ohio dairy farmers cashing in on gas well boom
  10. Even before Ebola contained, U.S. looks to next health crisis
  11. Police code of conduct aims to curb unlawful seizures from motorists
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.