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Agreement reached in 'To Kill a Mockingbird' copyright suit

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By The Journal News (N.y.)
Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

Author Nelle Harper Lee and literary agent Samuel Pinkus have reached an “agreement in principle” to settle a copyright lawsuit the famed author of “To Kill a Mockingbird” brought against him in May, a lawyer for Pinkus said Friday.

“The parties reached a mutually satisfactory resolution, and everybody would like at this point to put it behind them,” said attorney Vincent Carissimi of the Pepper Hamilton firm.

Carissimi said the settlement was reached in the past week, and papers dismissing the case would be filed in federal court next week. He declined to provide any details of the settlement.

Pinkus' wife, Leigh Ann Winick, and journalist and author Gerald Posner, whose Miami residence is listed as the address of one of Pinkus' literary companies, were dropped from the lawsuit, Carissimi said. The paperwork was filed in federal court in the Southern District of New York.

Lee, who won the Pulitzer prize in 1961 for “To Kill a Mockingbird,” alleged in her lawsuit that Pinkus “duped” her into signing over the copyright to the novel in 2007.

“To Kill a Mockingbird” sells about 750,000 copies each year in the United States and Canada. That doesn't include sales of the book in Great Britain and the dozens of languages the novel has been translated into. Lee has earned millions of dollars in royalties.

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