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Zimmerman's wife changes story about being threatened with gun

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By The Associated Press
Monday, Sept. 9, 2013, 8:15 p.m.
 

LAKE MARY, Fla. — The sobbing wife of George Zimmerman called 911 on Monday to report that her estranged husband was threatening her with a gun and had punched her father in the nose, but hours later, she decided not to press charges against the man acquitted of all charges for fatally shooting Trayvon Martin.

Lake Mary police officers were still investigating the encounter as a domestic dispute, but no charges had been filed Monday afternoon. Shellie Zimmerman left the house after being questioned by police. George Zimmerman remained there into early evening, and his attorney denied any wrongdoing by his client.

Shellie Zimmerman, who has filed for divorce, initially told a 911 dispatcher that her husband had his hand on his gun as he sat in his car outside the home she was at with her father. She said she was scared because she wasn't sure what he was capable of doing. Hours later, she changed her story and said she never saw a firearm, Lake Mary police Chief Steve Bracknell said.

For the time being, “domestic violence can't be invoked because she has changed her story and says she didn't see a firearm,” Bracknell said.

On the 911 call, Shellie Zimmerman is sobbing and repeating “Oh my God” as she talks to a police dispatcher. She yells at her father to get inside the house, saying Zimmerman may start shooting at them.

“He's threatening all of us with a firearm. ... He punched my dad in the nose,” Shellie Zimmerman said on the call. “I don't know what he's capable of. I'm really scared.”

She said he grabbed an iPad from her hand and smashed it.

George Zimmerman's attorney, Mark O'Mara, said his client never threatened his estranged wife and her father with a gun, and never punched his father-in-law. Shellie Zimmerman had collected most of her belongings on Saturday from the house, which is owned by her parents, where she and George had been staying until she moved out. She had returned unexpectedly on Monday to gather the remaining items. Emotions got out of control, but neither side is filing charges, O'Mara said.

 

 
 


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