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'We're wiped out again,' laments business owner on New Jersey boardwalk destroyed by fire

| Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, 7:09 p.m.
Firefighters battle a blaze in a building on the Seaside Park boardwalk on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013, in Seaside Park, N.J. The fire began in a frozen custard stand on the Seaside Park section of the boardwalk and quickly spread north into neighboring Seaside Heights. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
REUTERS
People look at the remnants of the boardwalk after a massive fire in Seaside Park in New Jersey, September 13, 2013. Two New Jersey beach towns devastated by Superstorm Sandy will once again need to rebuild, after a fast-moving fire reduced dozens of businesses along the towns' boardwalk to rubble. About 100 firefighters remained on the scene on Friday, putting out remaining hot spots after containing a fire that started at a frozen custard stand in Seaside Park on Thursday and blazed out of control for hours, moving several blocks into neighboring Seaside Heights. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

SEASIDE PARK, N.J. — They were the kind of places that made for family memories of french fries and ice cream, but also created some raucous reality TV, like the time Snooki was laid out by a barroom sucker punch.

They included an arcade where New Jersey's governor played Skee Ball with his wife and kids, and a shop where he ate pizza (at least before his recent weight-loss surgery). There were three frozen custard shacks, games of chance, and stores where tourists could buy naughty T-shirts.

And now they're gone, reduced to smoldering ruins by a spectacular fire that engulfed more than four blocks of a Jersey shore boardwalk that had been rebuilt just five months ago after being destroyed by Superstorm Sandy.

“We're wiped out again. It's just unimaginable,” said Daniel Shauger, manager of Funtown Arcade, which reopened June 1 — and struggled all summer — after Sandy's floodwaters ruined game machines and other equipment.

The cause of Thursday's blaze was under investigation, though prosecutors said they had seen no evidence it was suspicious.

Sending giant orange and red fireballs rolling 50 feet into the sky, the fire brought a painful sense of deja vu to the side-by-side communities of Seaside Park and Seaside Heights, which rely on the boardwalk and beach for their economic survival.

Three police officers leaving the fire scene were injured Friday morning when they fell from an emergency vehicle; two suffered head injuries. Their injuries were not believed to be life-threatening.

Gov. Chris Christie, as he did just after the Oct. 29 storm, vowed the two towns would rebuild.

“I will not permit all the work we've done over the last 10 months to be diminished or destroyed by what happened last night,” he said, standing across the street from a still-smoldering pizza shop and a gutted arcade that he used to patronize with his family.

He added: “We will make new memories, because that's what we do.”

Christie said about 30 businesses were destroyed, although authorities in the two towns said Thursday night more than 50 businesses had been wrecked, including 32 in Seaside Park and more than 20 in Seaside Heights.

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