TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

It's not easy to get rid of chemical arms

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, 7:18 p.m.
 

The United States has made significant progress in eradicating 90 percent of the 31,500 tons of chemical weapons it once possessed, but the military doesn't expect to complete destruction until 2023.

Experts say it's probably simpler to make chemical weapons than to get rid of them.

“Disposal requires such rigorous processes to ensure there is no pollution or residual agent,” said Susannah Sirkin, international policy director for Physicians for Human Rights, which has been monitoring weapons of mass destruction for more than two decades. “On average it is costing about 10 times more to destroy than it did to make the munitions.”

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. 3,000 U.S. troops to join fight against Ebola with $763M plan
  2. Entire Calif. town lost to wildfire as dozen other blazes rage
  3. Ohio bus driver dies removing girl from harm’s way
  4. Improved economy drives first decline in the national poverty rate in 7 years
  5. HealthCare.gov website’s security flaws put users’ personal info at risk
  6. Search for missing U. of Va. student shifted
  7. U.S. to assign 3,000 from U.S. military to fight Ebola
  8. White House committed to ethanol, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack says
  9. Yellowstone bison could be culled by 900
  10. Black lung disease on rise in Appalachia
  11. Meteor lights up night sky above eastern U.S.
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.