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It's not easy to get rid of chemical arms

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By The Associated Press
Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, 7:18 p.m.
 

The United States has made significant progress in eradicating 90 percent of the 31,500 tons of chemical weapons it once possessed, but the military doesn't expect to complete destruction until 2023.

Experts say it's probably simpler to make chemical weapons than to get rid of them.

“Disposal requires such rigorous processes to ensure there is no pollution or residual agent,” said Susannah Sirkin, international policy director for Physicians for Human Rights, which has been monitoring weapons of mass destruction for more than two decades. “On average it is costing about 10 times more to destroy than it did to make the munitions.”

 

 
 


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