TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

It's not easy to get rid of chemical arms

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, 7:18 p.m.
 

The United States has made significant progress in eradicating 90 percent of the 31,500 tons of chemical weapons it once possessed, but the military doesn't expect to complete destruction until 2023.

Experts say it's probably simpler to make chemical weapons than to get rid of them.

“Disposal requires such rigorous processes to ensure there is no pollution or residual agent,” said Susannah Sirkin, international policy director for Physicians for Human Rights, which has been monitoring weapons of mass destruction for more than two decades. “On average it is costing about 10 times more to destroy than it did to make the munitions.”

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Shootings, slayings surge during Memorial Day weekend in Chicago, Baltimore
  2. Oregon proposal would outlaw sneak photos up women’s skirts
  3. Texas man charged with helping friend’s bid to join ISIS
  4. 12 missing after flooding in Texas sweeps away vacation home
  5. More rain worsens flooding in Texas
  6. IRS says hackers stole tax info from 100,000
  7. ‘Free-range’ parents cleared of neglect
  8. Cleveland agrees to overhaul police under settlement with Justice Department
  9. Airman kills 1 in North Dakota store
  10. Gouging rare in loans to troops
  11. Ex-coal boss Blankenship wants July trial delayed to January