TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Break in rain helps Coloradans

About The Tribune-Review
The Tribune-Review can be reached via e-mail or at 412-321-6460.
Contact Us | Video | Photo Reprints
AP
A woman is helped off of a military helicopter at the Boulder Municipal Airport in Boulder, Colo., on on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, after being rescued. Thousands of people remained stranded by high water and washed out roads in the state. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Daily Photo Galleries


By USA Today

Published: Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, 8:09 p.m.

BOULDER, Colo. — The death toll from the flooding along Colorado's Front Range grew to seven on Monday as search-and-rescue operations intensified and the storms that have pummeled the state for a week began to subside.

State emergency officials did not release names or details about the latest victims.

Hundreds of residents remain unaccounted for, but the state's earlier estimate of more than 1,250 missing was expected to be significantly lowered after Larimer County officials reported about 400 missing, down from earlier state estimates of about 1,000. Exact numbers remain elusive, because many residents live in isolated or hard-to-reach mountain communities where scores of bridges and roads have been washed out and telephone, cellphone and Internet service has been disrupted for several days.

The National Weather Service expected warmer, drier conditions in the state, with rain ending at night. Yet officials warned there is still potential for flash flooding in and near saturated foothills late Monday afternoon into early evening, as lingering air moisture combined with warmer temperatures could cause scattered thunderstorms.

More than 1,200 people were rescued by vehicles and helicopters Saturday, but 16 rescue helicopters were grounded Sunday after some parts of flooded areas got up to 4 inches of new rain. After seven consecutive days of rain, some regions have gotten as much as 20 inches of rainfall, as much as rainfall in a typical year.

Colorado National Guard Lt. James Goff says 19 helicopters are available for search and rescue. The air rescue operation is one of the nation's largest since Hurricane Katrina but has been hampered by rains and fog.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Hearing to determine fate of sergeant accused of killing 2 deaf Iraqi boys
  2. IRS awards millions in bonuses to its people who don’t pay taxes
  3. Justices uphold Michigan ban on affirmative action, giving states room to maneuver
  4. Justices critical of Ohio law punishing campaign lies
  5. Details about USS Cole suspect’s stint in CIA custody must be turned over
  6. Precautions lack year since fatal blast at plant
  7. Mo. mayor steps down over anti-Semitic comments
  8. Attorney General Holder: New York City should have held trial of self-professed 9/11 mastermind
  9. 150-plus birds seized at fighting venue in W.Va.
  10. Mauling puts bears back on firing line in Central Florida
  11. Shale oil, gas drilling boom wins favor with labor unions, thwarting environmentalists
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.