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D.C. rampage: 'Nice' man struggled to rein in his temper

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By The Associated Press

Published: Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, 10:00 p.m.

Aaron Alexis seems a study in contradictions: a former Navy reservist, a Defense Department contractor, a convert to Buddhism who was taking an online course in aeronautics. But he had flashes of temper that led to run-ins with police over shootings in Fort Worth and Seattle.

A profile began to emerge on Monday of the man authorities identified as the gunman in a mass shooting at the Navy Yard in Washington that left 13 people dead, including the 34-year-old man. While some neighbors and acquaintances described him as “nice,” his father once told detectives in Seattle that his son had anger management problems related to post-traumatic stress brought on by the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

At the time of the shootings, he worked for The Experts, a subcontractor on an HP Enterprise Services contract to refresh equipment used on the Navy Marine Corps Intranet network.

His life during the past decade has been checkered.

Alexis lived in Seattle in 2004 and 2005, according to public documents. In 2004, Seattle police said, Alexis was arrested for shooting out the tires of another man's vehicle in what he later described to detectives as an anger-fueled “blackout.” According to an account on the department's website, two construction workers had parked their Honda Accord in the driveway of their work site, next to a home where Alexis was staying. The workers reported seeing a man, later identified by police as Alexis, walk out of the home next to their work site, pull a gun from his waistband and fire three shots into the rear tires of their Honda before he walked slowly back to his home.

When detectives interviewed workers at the construction site, they told police Alexis had stared at construction workers at the job site daily for several weeks before the shooting. The owner of the construction business told police he believed Alexis was angry over the parking situation around the site.

Police eventually arrested Alexis, searched his home, found a gun and ammunition in his room, and booked him into the King County Jail for malicious mischief.

According to the police account, Alexis told detectives he perceived he had been “mocked” by construction workers the morning of the incident. Alexis claimed he couldn't remember firing his gun at the Honda until an hour after the incident.

Alexis told police he was present during “the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001” and described “how those events had disturbed him.”

Then, on May 5, 2007, he enlisted in the Navy Reserve, serving through 2011, according to a Navy spokeswoman, Lt. Megan Shutka.

Shutka said Alexis received the National Defense Service Medal and the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal during his stint in the reserves. Both are medals issued to large numbers of service members who served abroad and in the United States since the 9/11 attacks. Alexis' last assignment was as aviation electricians mate 3rd class at the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base in Fort Worth, Shutka said.

It was while he was still in the reserves that a neighbor in Fort Worth reported she had been nearly struck by a bullet shot from his downstairs apartment.

In September 2010, Fort Worth police questioned Alexis about the neighbor's report; he admitted to firing his weapon but said he was cleaning his gun when it accidentally discharged. He said he didn't call the police because he didn't think the bullet went through to the other apartment. The neighbor told police she was scared of Alexis and felt he fired intentionally because he had complained about her making too much noise.

Alexis was arrested on suspicion of discharging a firearm within city limits. Tarrant County district attorney's spokeswoman Melody McDonald Lanier said the case was not pursued after it was determined the gun had discharged accidentally.

After leaving the reserves, Alexis worked as a waiter and delivery driver at the Happy Bowl Thai restaurant in White Settlement, a suburb of Fort Worth, according to Afton Bradley, a former co-worker. The two overlapped for about eight months before Alexis left in May, Bradley said.

Having traveled to Thailand, Alexis learned some Thai and could speak to Thai customers in their native language.

“He was a very nice person,” Bradley said in a phone interview. “It kind of blows my mind away. I wouldn't think anything bad at all.”

 

 
 


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