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Spending bill's prospects brighten

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By The Associated Press
Monday, Sept. 23, 2013, 8:45 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — In a break with Tea Party-aligned Senate conservatives, Republican leader Mitch McConnell announced on Monday he will not vote to block legislation aimed at preventing a partial government shutdown, even though Democrats intend to rewrite it to restore money needed to keep the nation's three-year-old health care law in existence.

Referring to a bill the House passed last week, McConnell's spokesman said the Kentucky lawmaker supports the measure “and will not vote to block it, since it defunds Obamacare and funds the government without increasing spending by a penny.”

The spokesman, Don Stewart, added that McConnell will vote against any Democratic attempt to restore funding for the health care law.

The announcement occurred shortly after Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, said that anyone who votes to let the bill advance toward final passage will be choosing to allow the Democrats to restore the health care money by majority vote, one they will almost certainly win.

With his announcement, McConnell put himself firmly in the camp of Republicans who are adamantly opposed to any partial government shutdown, no matter the other stakes.

A short time later, Sen. John Cornyn, like Cruz a Texan, and second ranking in the leadership, announced he would not seek to block the legislation. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., took the same position.

Democrats control 54 Senate votes, meaning they need six crossover Republicans to assure the spending bill does not fall victim to a filibuster that would doom its prospects. The announcements by McConnell and McCain likely indicate they will have no difficulty in gaining the support they need.

Cruz said last week he was prepared to filibuster any legislation that restores money for the health care law, even if it meant a shutdown. In remarks on the Senate floor, though, he appeared to soften his tone.

“We should not have a government shutdown, and we should never, ever, ever even discuss a default on the debt,” he said.

The House is expected to approve legislation this week that permits the Treasury to borrow freely for a year while delaying the health care law for a year.

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