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Surveillance limits could tighten

AP
Director of National Intelligence James Clapper on Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013, told lawmakers on the Senate Intelligence Committee that he's willing to consider limits on surveillance by the National Security Agency.

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By Reuters

Published: Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013, 8:00 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers and intelligence chiefs, hoping to stifle an outcry over the government's collection of personal communications data, said on Thursday they were open to measures tightening oversight of the government's sweeping electronic eavesdropping programs.

At a hearing on how to change the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act to balance security and privacy concerns, the Senate Intelligence Committee revealed provisions of proposed legislation to set new controls on government surveillance.

Among other things, the measure would set tighter standards on which telephone and Internet records the National Security Agency can collect and limit the time that records can be held, said Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the committee's chairwoman.

Acknowledging a “lowering of trust” in spy agencies, James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, said he would consider measures including limiting how long data is kept and releasing more information about how it is used.

Clapper and other witnesses, NSA Director Keith Alexander and Deputy Attorney Gen. James Cole, said they would consider allowing the appointment of an outside advocate for some important cases in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which oversees the eavesdropping programs.

President Obama said in August he supported the idea, which is backed by many lawmakers.

The Intelligence Committee is considering requiring that analysts have a “reasonable articulable suspicion” that a telephone number was associated with terrorism before querying government telephone records, Feinstein said.

It would make the appointment of the director of the NSA subject to confirmation by the Senate.

Concern about surveillance — and privacy — has been growing since former NSA contractor Edward Snowden leaked information starting in June that the government collects far more Internet and telephone data than previously known.

Thursday's hearing was the latest in a series in Congress to address concerns over the scope of the NSA programs.

“There's no way to erase or make up for the damage that has already been done. We anticipate more as we continue our assessment,” Clapper said.

Many legislators — especially on the Senate and House of Representatives intelligence committees, which oversee the confidential programs — staunchly defended the surveillance.

The intelligence panel is due to debate its legislation next week, a prelude toward sending the bill for consideration by the full Senate.

 

 
 


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