TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

NSA workers spied on their loved ones

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, 8:21 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Some workers at the National Security Agency intentionally misused the government's secret surveillance systems at least 12 times over the past decade, including instances when they spied on spouses, boyfriends or girlfriends, according to embarrassing new details disclosed by the agency's inspector general. In nearly every case, the workers were allowed to retire before they could be punished.

In addition to the 12 historical cases, authorities are investigating two other suspected violations and reviewing a third allegation for possible investigation, the inspector general, George Ellard, told Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, in a letter released late Thursday.

Senior national security officials and some lawmakers have said such cases were exceedingly rare considering the breadth of the NSA's surveillance programs and reflect how seriously the government monitors use of its systems for potential abuses.

“Where (a media report) says we're sweeping up the communications of civilians overseas that aren't targets of collection systems is wrong,” the NSA's director, Army Gen. Keith Alexander, told senators Thursday. “If our folks do that, we hold them accountable.”

At least six times the cases were reported to the Justice Department for possible prosecution, Ellard's letter said. In some cases, prosecutors declined to take action but in nearly every case the employees were allowed to retire without punishment. In one case, a worker was suspended without pay then retired; in another case, a worker's promotion was canceled; in two cases, military employees suffered a reduction in rank, extra duty and brief reduction in salary for two months.

Public concerns about how telephone and Internet surveillance data is handled by the NSA have intensified as a result of leaks about the agency's programs by former contract employee Edward Snowden.

With the Senate readying to consider new limits on the NSA's spying programs, national security officials have sought to boost confidence in their procedures. Senior officials have said they moved quickly to report and correct internal problems that led to the NSA's accidental collection of 56,000 emails and other communications by Americans, and they insisted that willful abuse of surveillance data by officials is almost non-existent.

Grassley, who had asked Ellard last month to provide more information about the 12 violations, urged robust oversight of the secret programs.

“We shouldn't tolerate even one misuse of this program,” he said.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. U.S., Cuba patching torn relations with historic accord
  2. Study: At least 786 child abuse victims died despite being on protective services’ radar
  3. $1.5B more a year — from fees tacked onto phone bills — earmarked for faster Internet
  4. Republican lawmakers vow to block confirmation of any potential ambassador to Cuba
  5. Use of U.S. steel to fix Alaska terminal causes rift with Canada
  6. End ‘mindless’ military spending caps, Aerospace Industries Association says
  7. Fracking essentially banned in N.Y.
  8. Castle doctrine doesn’t hold up in Montana murder case
  9. Lifting limits on Cuba a boon for U.S.
  10. Conn. dentist’s license suspended over death
  11. Sale of ‘Breathe Easy’ shirts blasted amid Indiana protests
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.