Share This Page

Patient's body found in stairwell

| Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2013, 7:42 p.m.

SAN FRANCISCO — A patient who disappeared from her room in San Francisco's main hospital more than two weeks ago has been identified as the woman found dead this week in a stairwell at the facility, authorities said on Wednesday as they continued to investigate how she got there and what caused her death.

San Francisco General Hospital Chief Medical Officer Todd May said officials were awaiting confirmation of the woman's identity from the medical examiner's office. But he said hospital officials had enough information to conclude it was 57-year-old Lynne Spalding.

“What happened at our hospital is horrible,” a visibly emotional May said at a news conference. “We are here to take care of patients, to heal them, to keep them safe. This has shaken us to our core. Our staff is devastated.”

The San Francisco Sheriff's Department provides security at the public hospital, which has more than 400 beds and serves about 100,000 patients a year.

Sheriff's officials do not know how long Spalding had been in the stairwell, which is part of a fire exit that has an alarm on it, is locked from the outside and exits onto hospital grounds, Assistant Sheriff Paul Miyamoto said.

She was admitted to San Francisco General Hospital for an infection on Sept. 19 and was reported missing from her room there two days later.

Miyamoto said a member of the hospital's engineering staff found Spalding on Tuesday — 17 days after she disappeared — while conducting a routine quarterly check.

“All of us are committed to learning what happened and ensuring it never happens again,” Miyamoto said.

David Perry, a friend of Spalding's who is acting as a spokesman for her family, called the news a “nightmare” and said city officials have a lot of explaining to do. Spalding's relatives and friends spent days “scouring the streets of San Francisco with flyers because we were under the assumption that San Francisco General had been searched and Lynne was not here,” Perry said.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.