TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Judge denies request by Ohio man to reverse ruling that declared him legally dead

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, 5:09 p.m.
 

FINDLAY, Ohio — A man who disappeared decades ago is finding out there's no easy way to come back from the dead.

Donald Miller Jr. went to court this week to ask a county judge to reverse a 1994 ruling that declared him legally dead after he had vanished from his home eight years earlier. But the judge turned down his request, citing a three-year time limit for changing a death ruling.

Hancock County Probate Court Judge Allan Davis called it a “strange, strange situation.”

“We've got the obvious here. A man sitting in the courtroom, he appears to be in good health,” said Davis, who told Miller the three-year limit was clear.

“I don't know where that leaves you, but you're still deceased as far as the law is concerned,” the judge said.

Miller resurfaced about eight years ago and went to court so that he could get a driver's license and reinstate his Social Security number.

His ex-wife had opposed the move, saying she doesn't have the money to repay the Social Security benefits that were paid out to her and the couple's two children after Miller was declared dead.

Robin Miller said her former husband vanished because he owed big child support payments and that the overdue payments had totaled $26,000 by 1994, The (Findlay) Courier reported.

Miller, 61, told the judge that he disappeared in the 1980s because he had lost his job and he was an alcoholic. He lived in Florida and Georgia before returning to Ohio around 2005.

His parents told him about his “death” when he came back to the state, he said.

“It kind of went further than I ever expected it to,” Miller said. “I just kind of took off, ended up in different places.”

Miller's attorney said he may be able to challenge the Social Security Administration in federal court, but does not have the financial resources to do so.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Family finds $1M gold treasure in Florida
  2. Hope dims for Fla. teens lost at sea
  3. Pollard, spy for Israel in the 1980s, to be released from prison
  4. GOP says there’s no deal with Clinton on Benghazi testimony
  5. Conservation group reports pollution high in state parks
  6. Oklahoma earthquakes shut down wells
  7. Cat found alive aboard sunken boat pulled from Lake Havasu
  8. Medicare patients’ outcomes improve
  9. They still have snow in Buffalo
  10. Backers of Colo. school board recall claim 90K signatures
  11. L.A. bans handgun, rifle magazines that hold more than 10 rounds