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Snooping backlash goes global in bid to foil NSA surveillance

AP
Software engineer and entrepreneur Jeff Lyon's 'Flagger' program adds terms such as 'blow up' and 'pressure cooker' to web addresses that users visit in a bid to overwhelm would-be snoops with red-flagged terms.

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By The Associated Press
Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013, 7:15 p.m.
 

SAN JOSE, Calif. — From Silicon Valley to the South Pacific, counterattacks to revelations of widespread National Security Agency surveillance are taking shape: from a surge of new encrypted email programs to technology that sprinkles the Internet with red-flag terms to confuse would-be snoops.

Policy makers, privacy advocates and political leaders around the world have been outraged at the near weekly disclosures from former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden that expose wide-ranging U.S. government surveillance programs.

“Until this summer, people didn't know anything about the NSA,” said Amy Zegart, co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. “Their own secrecy has come back to bite them.”

Activists are fighting back with high-tech civil disobedience, entrepreneurs want to cash in on privacy concerns, Internet users want to keep snoops out of their computers, and lawmakers want to establish stricter parameters.

Some of the tactics are more effective than others. For example, Flagger, a program that adds words such as “blow up” and “pressure cooker” to Web addresses that users visit, is probably more of a political statement than actually confounding intelligence agents.

Developer Jeff Lyon in Santa Clara, Calif., said he's delighted if it generates social awareness, and that 2,000 users have installed it to date. He said, “The goal here is to get a critical mass of people flooding the Internet with noise and make a statement of civil disobedience.”

University of Auckland associate professor Gehan Gunasekara said he has received “overwhelming support” for his proposal to “lead the spooks in a merry dance,” visiting radical websites, setting up multiple online identities and making up hypothetical “friends.”

And “pretty soon, everyone in New Zealand will have to be under surveillance,” he said.

Electronic Frontier Foundation activist Parker Higgens in San Francisco has a more direct strategy: By using encrypted email and browsers, he creates more smoke screens for the NSA. “Encryption loses its value as an indicator of possible malfeasance if everyone is using it,” he said.

And there are now plenty of encryption programs, many new, and of varying quality.

“This whole field has been made exponentially more mainstream,” said Cryptocat private instant messaging developer Nadim Kobeissi.

Last week, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University released a smartphone app called SafeSlinger that they say encrypts text messages so they cannot be read by cell carriers, Internet providers, employers “or anyone else.”

CryptoParties are springing up around the world as well. They are small gatherings where hosts teach attendees, who bring their digital devices, how to download and use encrypted email and secure browsers.

“Honestly, it doesn't matter who you are or what you are doing. If the NSA wants to find information, they will,” organizer Joshua Smith said. “But we don't have to make it easy for them.”

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